Psychology Courses

Psychology Course Catalog
Course Descriptions & Expected Learning Outcomes

100-299:  Lower-division courses primarily for freshmen and sophomores.

Course Description

Only for students who have not taken the psychology section of INDV 101. (The Structure of Mind and Behavior) or PSY 150A1. In the absence of INDV 101 or PSY 150A1, this course is required for admission to all other psychology courses. See University General Education, Tier One. Survey of psychology including history, systems, and methods; structure and functions of the nervous and endocrine systems; learning; motivation and emotion; perception; memory; thought and language; personality; development; social cognition and behavior; psychopathology and psychotherapy.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  1. Define and describe the key concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in the field of psychology.
  2. Identify, analyze, and interpret the common research methods and quantitative methods used in the field of psychology.
  3. Develop hypotheses, propose methods for testing hypotheses, and evaluate data to reach a conclusion.
  4. Apply skeptical inquiry and critical thought when interpreting psychological research data and findings.
  5. Interpret data from psychological science to solve larger problems.
  6. Describe applications of psychological research findings into everyday life.
  7. Apply ethical standards to evaluate psychological science and practice.
  8. Explain how social and personal biases have influenced psychological research, and identify the benefits of becoming a more diverse and inclusive field.
Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:
  1. Career & Self Development – This course will explore different career pathways of Psychology graduates for our program. Additionally, students will learn about the research labs of current faculty members within our department (healthy mind, brain, & lives assignment)
  2. Communication – Students will develop their written communication skills by working on two separate projects that ask them to clearly articulate thoughts and ideas and communicate them in written forms to people within academia (psych spotlight) and outside academia (healthy mind, brain, & lives project)
  3. Equity & Inclusion – Students will consider how social and personal biases have influenced psychological research and identify the benefits of becoming a more diverse and inclusive field (DEI project)
  4. Teamwork – Students will enhance their teamwork and collaboration skills by participating in a semester-long group project (psych spotlight project). This will require students to develop crucial skills related to a virtual team's formation, maintenance, and performance. In many respects, this is more challenging than in-person collaboration/teamwork.
  5. Technology – Since this course is fully online, students will learn to navigate various online learning tools to complete assignments and collaborate with their peers. Students will actively work with the following technology: Adobe Rush, Google Drive, and Powerpoint (Psych Spotlight – content creation and collaboration), Voicethread

Course Description

Only for students who have not taken PSYC/PSY 101 (Introduction to Psychology). An introduction to mind and behavior. Broad coverage of wide-ranging issues including how minds reflect social influence and how neural systems underlie thoughts and conscious awareness.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  1. Define and describe the key concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in the field of psychology.
  2. Identify, analyze, and interpret the common research methods and quantitative methods used in the field of psychology.
  3. Develop hypotheses, propose methods for testing hypotheses, and evaluate data to reach a conclusion.
  4. Apply skeptical inquiry and critical thought when interpreting psychological research data and findings.
  5. Interpret data from psychological science to solve larger problems.
  6. Describe applications of psychological research findings into everyday life.
  7. Apply ethical standards to evaluate psychological science and practice.
  8. Explain how social and personal biases have influenced psychological research, and identify the benefits of becoming a more diverse and inclusive field.
Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:

TBD

Course Description

Students will explore and better understand the bases of thinking. They will become aware of how to detect and avoid decision manipulation traps. They will become more aware of understand the brains correlation between cognition and decision-making. Students will gain understanding on the evolution of cognition. Discovering the similarities and differences of human cognition and animal (especially primate) problem solving and communication.

Expected Learning Outcomes:

TBD

Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:

TBD

 

    Course Description

    Does sleep improve memory? Does having friends improve mental health? These questions can be examined through controlled scientific experiments. This course will teach students the methods of statistics that are used for exploring data collected in experiments and for evaluating scientific hypotheses. Students will learn how to apply the core statistical tools used in science such as t-tests, ANOVA, regression, and Chi-square tests.

    Expected Learning Outcomes

    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

    1. Define and describe basic statistical terminology and procedures 
    2. Identify and conduct appropriate statistical analyses for hypothesis testing 
    3. Critically evaluate results of psychological research and interpret research results into everyday language 
    4. Recognize the systemic influences of sociocultural, theoretical, and personal biases on the research enterprise and evaluate the effectiveness with which researchers address those influences in psychological research.
    Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:
    1. Technology – Since this course is fully online, students will learn to navigate various online tools to complete assignments.
    2. Critical Thought – Students analyze, summarize, and interpret data and effectively communicate key take-aways (Article Review Assignment)

    Course Description

    Psychology majors will gain experience in a range of psychological research methods.

    Expected Learning Outcomes

    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

    1. Systematically evaluate the validity of different claims that you might encounter in future psychology textbooks, in psychology research articles, in the media, or in casual conversation.   
    2. Plan psychological research that can test different claims.  
    3. Identify the pros and cons of different research choices and plan research that optimizes these pros and cons.
    4. Describe and explain the importance of sampling diverse populations in research and how the lack of diversity in samples has implications scientifically and ethically.
    Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:

    TBD

    300-399: Upper-division courses primarily for juniors and seniors.

    Course Description

    This course is a user guide to your brain. How do you store a lifetime of memories, make difficult decisions, and understand and generate language? What factors drive how you perceive the world and engage in a wide range of motor actions from taking a single step to dancing? What enables you to feel emotions and understand what others are thinking? The main objective of this course is for you to advance your knowledge of how the brain supports these cognitive abilities and others. Major topics will include sensation and perception, motor control, attention, learning and memory, language, executive functions, and social cognition. To cover these topics, you will be exposed to multiple methods for studying the brain, including a variety of modern brain imaging techniques as well as examination of individuals with brain lesions.

    Expected Learning Outcomes

    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

    1. Learn about the organization of the brain and the methods of a cognitive neuroscientist. 

    Expected Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of brain structure and function and how cognitive neuroscientists use different methods to study the neural bases of the mind. 

    1. To learn how the brain perceives and acts. 

    Expected Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of how the brain perceives the world through multiple sensory channels and translates thoughts into simple and complex motor responses. 

    1. To learn how certain brain regions support different aspects of cognition. 

    Expected Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of how cognitive neuroscientists break down “cognition” into broad domains and how brain regions support different components of these cognitive domains. 

    1. To learn how the structure and function of the brain can change. 

    Expected Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of how the brain develops and changes because of experience, injury, practice, and age. 

    1. To understand the importance of sociocultural and other individual difference factors in cognitive neuroscience.   

    Expected Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of sociocultural influences and other individual differences on aspects of perception, action and cognition, and acknowledge that such factors should be taken into account when designing studies and evaluating the findings and generalizability of research in cognitive neuroscience. This outcome will be assessed through performance on exams, collaborative in-class discussion and participation, homework packets, and critical written synthesis of a research finding in recent literature. 

     

    Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:

    TBD

     

    Course Description

    Humans have used mind-altering drugs for thousands of years. These mind altering drugs come in many forms, ranging from common drugs such as caffeine, Adderall, and alcohol, to illicit drugs such as LSD and heroin. Advances in neuroscience and psychology have greatly expanded our capacity to understand
    how drugs alter neural circuits and how these alterations affect decision making, perception, and memory. This course will explore the connection between drugs, brains, and cognition and incorporate recent discoveries in neuroscience, biochemistry, and psychology. The course will be a combination of lectures and discussion of recent brain and behavior related science news and readings from instructors and students.

    Expected Learning Outcomes

    TBD

    Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:

    TBD

     

    Course Description

    In this course you will learn how young children learn to think, starting in infancy and extending into early and middle childhood, along with theories and experimental methods used to study cognitive development. For example, you will learn about the negative effects of early media exposure, how children learn to take another person's perspective, that infants and toddlers understand much more than they can say, about the development of self-control, the reliability of children's eyewitness testimony, surprising ideas children have about the size of themselves and their toys, how well we can predict children's school performance from tests of basic cognitive processes, how children "learn" to learn, and the effect of culture on the developing mind. Writing Emphasis Course.

    Expected Learning Outcomes

    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

    1. Define key terms and concepts in cognitive development.
    2. Describe and compare the ages at which typically developing children engage in particular cognitive behaviors.
    3. Evaluate how scientific data apply to theories of cognitive development.
    Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:

    TBD

    Course Description

    Basic concepts and issues in personality theory and research; approaches to personality description and assessment.

    Expected Learning Outcomes:

    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

    1. Explain the trait approach to personality, and how we might measure traits 
    2. Describe the role of biological and evolutionary and social forces in determining personality
    3. Identify ways in which psychological processes such as motivation, cognition, and emotion influence personality 
    4. Describe the psychoanalytic perspective on personality, and how it has shaped the field 
    5. Analyze and interpret scientific research on the above topics 
    6. Describe how diversity among human beings contributes to individual differences in personality, as well as how psychologists have explored this relationship.

     

    Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:

    TBD

    Course Description

    Introduction to the major theories and research findings of social psychology. Specific topics covered in the class include the self, social cognition, attitudes, interpersonal relations, group processes, prejudice, and aggression.

    Expected Learning Outcomes:

    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

    1. Explain how perception, cognition, and attitude-formation are shaped by social situations 
    2. Identify, accurately describe, and distinguish between different social psychological concepts, including relevant social psychology theories, basic human motivations, and social influences on human thought and behavior 
    3. Apply the information learned in the class to real life settings, recognizing social psychology concepts all around us
    4. Synthesize theory and research concerning the causes, consequences, and possible solutions to interpersonal and institutional prejudice and discrimination on the basis of gender, race, sexual orientation, and religious, cultural, or national background.
    5.  Analyze the ways in which social and cultural factors contribute to a diverse range of identities, beliefs, attitudes, and cognitive styles in our society.

     

    Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:

    TBD

    Course Description

    Social-psychological and developmental aspects of human sexuality. Examples of topics include: courtship, pregnancy and delivery, sexual health, and sex education.

    Expected Learning Outcomes

    TBD

    Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:

    TBD

    Course Description

    In this course, students will examine conceptions of healthy aging within the United States and cross-culturally. Students will explore how social factors like changing relationships and changing self-concept contribute to aspects of aging. Learning about culturally-specific theories of aging, students will consider how cultural norms and expectations influence perceptions of healthy aging. By the end of the class, students should be left with an impression of what constitutes "healthy aging" in the United States and elsewhere. Furthermore, students will learn active strategies that can be employed to help contribute to a successful aging process embedded within the larger sociocultural context.

    Expected Learning Outcomes:

    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

    1. Identify key relationships and key relationship transitions that occur in older adulthood.
    2. Apply sociocultural theory to the various relationships older adults encounter in the United States.
    3. Describe the purpose of theories of aging and relationships in a sociocultural context.
    4. Identify and recognize strategies for maintaining or improving psychological well-being throughout aging relationships.
    5. Prepare for a career in the field through expressing critical thought and problem solving by applying research and supported evidence into practice.
    6. Demonstrate an awareness, attitude, and knowledge required to equitably engage with older adults and peers of diverse backgrounds.
    Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:

    TBD

    Course Description

    This course is intended to be an introduction to the scientific study of the psychology of terrorism. Topics will include definitions of terrorism, pathological and non-pathological psychological reactions to terrorism, psychological factors that may contribute to terrorist behavior, systems for communicating terrorism threats, possible methods to reduce terrorism, and resilience and post-traumatic growth.

    Expected Learning Outcomes:

    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

    1. Critically evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the many definitions of terrorism that are in use today.
    2. Explain the key findings (and limitations) of traditional research on psychopathology in response to terrorism.
    3. Apply a wide range of existing psychological theories to an understanding of nonpathological responses to terrorism.
    4. Explain possible contributing factors to the motivation and decision to carry out a terrorist attack.
    5. Evaluate threat dissemination techniques for their benefits and drawbacks.
    6. Identify predictors of psychological resilience and post-traumatic growth in response to terrorism.
    7. Evaluate the potential effectiveness of various anti- and counter-terrorism approaches.
    Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:

    TBD

    Course Description

    This course will serve as a broad introduction to the topic of child maltreatment from a psychological perspective. The course will examine the history of child maltreatment in the United States as well as the numerous roles that professionals play in the prevention, investigation, and treatment of
    maltreatment. Students will be challenged to critically examine the methodological approaches to the study of maltreatment and the way maltreated children interact with multiple institutions. Moreover, students will be introduced to literature as it applies to various types of maltreatment, including physical, sexual, and emotional abuse, neglect, and less common forms of abuse (such as factitious disorder by proxy, sibling abuse, bullying, and institutional maltreatment).

    Expected Learning Outcomes

    TBD

    Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:

    TBD

    Course Description

    Abnormal psychology is a branch of psychology that empirically studies abnormalities in cognition, emotion, and behavior. This course is intended to provide a broad overview of mental illness, with a special emphasis on the classification of mental illness by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual 5 (DSM-5). The course will also cover theoretical approaches to treating mental health problems and specific treatments that work and do not work for different diagnoses. In addition to learning about diagnosis and treatment, students will be introduced to the biopsychosocial model and the causal theories behind diagnoses.

    Expected Learning Outcomes

    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

    1. Explain the issues involved in defining abnormal and normal behavior and describe the historical development of those definitions. 
    2. Explain the biopsychosocial and cultural factors that influence the development, expression, course, and prevalence of mental illness. 
    3. Define the approach and scientific status of different clinical interventions and the role of major theoretical orientations in developing clinical interventions. 
    4. Distinguish between the origins, scientific basis, and cultural context of the DSM as well as the structure and evidence base for the most recent iteration of the DSM.  
    5. Describe how culture is considered in diagnosing and treating mental illness. 
    6. Describe the symptoms, epidemiology, etiology, and treatment of principal mental disorders. 
    7. Distinguish between different types of mental health professionals and the career paths for the different professions. 
    Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:

    TBD

     

    Course Description

    The main aim of Health Psychology is to introduce students to the broad theories, terminology, and substantive research findings of the field through consideration of the psychological influences on illness and wellness, as well as the effects of physical health on psychosocial functioning. Throughout the term, we will examine how these processes operate across varied levels of analysis, including, for example, consideration of the different biological systems of the body, how people make health behavior changes, the effects of interpersonal contexts on physical health, the development, maintenance, and psychosocial correlates of specific diseases, cultural variation in disease and health behaviors, and the role of larger systems in promoting wellness and the management of chronic illness.

    Expected Learning Outcomes

    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

    1. Describe the historical origins of health psychology as a field and understand the contributions of health psychology to the study of human well-being and illness.
    2. Define the bio-psycho-social model and differentiate this model from the biomedical model.
    3. Define the basic physiological responses associated with acute and chronic stress, including a basic understanding of the autonomic nervous system, the endocrine system, and the immune system, as well as seminal findings from the field of psychoneuroimmunology.
    4. Describe the links between health behaviors and chronic illness, as well as the major theories and findings around health behavior change.
    5. Describe how the scientific method can be applied to test hypotheses specific to health psychology.
    6. Understand the roles that psychologists play in a variety of medical settings and how psychosocial interventions can be used to intervene with a number of medical problems
    7. Explain the role of social and cultural factors in health, including socioeconomic status, close relationships, and one’s status as a member of a historically underrepresented group.
    Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:

    TBD

     

    Course Description

    Positive Psychology is the scientific study of the kinds of things that lead to well-being, resilience, and happiness. In this course, we will review some of recent research in this area, covering a range of topics such as the effects of sleep, exercise, community, meditation, medication, laughter, acts of kindness, and play (among others). We will also consider how well-being is measured and assessed, from questionnaires and self-reflection to physiological tests.

    Expected Learning Outcomes

    TBD

    Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:

    TBD

    Course Description

    The purpose of this course is to provide undergraduates who wish to pursue graduate studies in academic psychology with a thorough grounding in research methods. This course focuses on the students' ability to conduct scientific research rather than on their ability to understand and evaluate research produced by others. It will consist almost entirely of interactive lab sessions rather than a series of lectures. We will begin by thoroughly grounding students in research ethics, and all students will leave with their CITI training complete. A portion of the course is dedicated to teaching system and software administration skills. The bulk of the course will consist of experimental projects, each using a different methodology for collecting and analyzing data. The scientific content of these projects will be determined by the individual instructor.

    Expected Learning Outcomes

    This course is a writing-intensive, advanced research methods course.  Upon successful completion of the course, the student should be able to:

    1. Demonstrate broad knowledge concerning the philosophy, logic, and standard implementation of several psychological research methods.
    2. Design a psychological study.
    3. Collect and analyze data for a psychological study.
    4. Write a research manuscript based on a psychological study.
    Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:

    TBD

     

    Course Description

    In this course, Psychology majors explore the many and varied career pathways that they may encounter with a Bachelor's degree in the field. This course is designed to allow students to apply psychology-specific content and skills to career goals. Students will be challenged to articulate, apply, and exhibit skills derived from psychology to best prepare them for successful careers in the workforce.

    Expected Learning Outcomes:

    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate understanding of key learning principles from research in the learning sciences.
    2. Apply learning principles covered in the course to your own studying practices.
    3. Reflect on the successes and challenges of your own use of the learning strategies.
    Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:

    TBD

     

    400-499: Upper-division courses primarily for juniors and seniors.

    Course Description

    What cognitive skills do various animal species share with humans?  Are cognitive similarities across species due to shared genetics or shared environmental demands? Some of the cognitive skills explored in this course include: the ability to generalize beyond specific experiences to a more abstract representation of the world; awareness of self and others; learning to use tools from other members of your species; communication and language; and social structure and morality.  Research on these topics provides new perspectives on what it means to be human. Writing Emphasis.

    Expected Learning Outcomes:

    Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

    1. Define key terms and concepts in comparative cognition.
    2. Be familiar with the difficulties involved in determining what any organism without language "knows".
    3. Be able to write about the scientific and social implications of different findings on animal cognition.

     

    Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:

    TBD

    Course Description

    Physiological, neurotoxic, and behavioral effects of drugs on individual neurotransmitter systems in the brain. Special emphasis will be given to the historical use and political significance of the major drugs of abuse.

    Expected Learning Outcomes:

    Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

    1. Describe what a neurotransmitter is and how neurotransmitters are released by and affect neurons.
    2. Understand the brain systems involved in mood, movement, decision making, memory, and perception.
    3. Understand how drugs act on neural systems to alter thought and mood.
    4. Students will develop an understanding of brain regions are involved in addiction and associative learning.
    5. Describe neurotransmitter system(s) linked to depression, addiction, and neurological diseases.
    6. Be able to identify a quality peer-reviewed scientific article from non-peer-reviewed research or reviews.
    Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:

    TBD

    Course Description

    Biological, psychological, and social issues in aging, including brain changes with age, cognitive change with age, and the social impact of increasingly older population demographics. Writing emphasis.

    Expected Learning Outcomes:

    Upon successful completion of this course, you should be able to:

    • Identify and describe the differences between normative and pathological aging 
    • Evaluate how our senses change with aging 
    • Describe the cognitive processes that are expected to change with age and ones that are expected to be preserved
    • Identify common misconceptions regarding aging based on Palmore’s Facts on Aging Quiz
    • Identify and describe issues related to diversity, equity, and inclusion in the field of Aging Sciences.
    Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:

    TBD

    Course Description

    Examines the processing systems that underlie human learning, memory and cognition; emphasizing cognitive, neuroscientific and computational approaches to research and theory.

    Expected Learning Outcomes:

    Upon the completion of this course, students should be able to:

    • Distinguish between essential topics concerning age-related memory and cognitive impairment.
    • Identify cognitive symptoms of four common neurodegenerative causes of dementia.
    • Learn about the cognitive consequences of three common age-related medical conditions, namely Parkinson’s disease, traumatic brain injury, and cancer.
    • Describe age-related mental health, psychosocial, and lifestyle factors that can be problematic among older adults, and how these factors can be assessed and treated to improve quality of life.
    • Identify pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments and interventions for many of the conditions discussed in this course.
    Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:

    TBD

    Course Description

    Basic concepts in a psychology of death and loss, with emphasis on both the adjustment to death and loss, and the underlying phenomenal, humanistic, and current social considerations.

    Expected Learning Outcomes:

    At the end of this course, you will be able to...

    • Reflect on and discuss your personal beliefs, values and attitudes toward death and dying.
    • Gain an appreciation how awareness of mortality contributes to the construction of meaning in one’s life.
    • Discuss components of end-of-life care planning.
    • Apply the concept of normative and disordered grief to case examples.
    • Describe interventions, strategies and resources for coping with dying and bereavement within the context of individual and cultural variations.
    • Summarize and interpret research in the area of death, dying and bereavement using conceptual and methodological skills learned throughout the semester.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of death and dying attitudes and practices across various cultures
    Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:

    TBD

    Course Description

    Explores the etiology of youth violence from developmental and socio-cultural perspectives, the influence of societal factors such as media, guns, and gangs on violence among youth.

    Expected Learning Outcomes:

    By the end of the course, students should be able to…

    • Define and describe 5 theories of youth violence through case study assignments, notetaking, and quizzes
    • Identify special considerations of youths such as gangs and family life through readings, videos, discussion posts, and quizzes
    • Evaluate prevention programs through readings, quizzes, and writing assignments
    Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:

    TBD

    Course Description

    This course will explore change and continuity in the biological, psychological and social processes associated with adulthood, with an emphasis on late life. Approximately half of the course time will be spent in the classroom learning the fundamentals of adult development and aging, and half the time will be spent in community-based facilities that provide independent or assisted living accommodations for seniors in the community. Students will have the opportunity to engage older adults in conversation, and experience first-hand the broad range of individual differences that occur with aging. This engagement component requires that students make a commitment to attend all classes.

    Expected Learning Outcomes:

    By the end of the course, students should be able to…

    • Objective 1. Explore the various stereotypes of aging and the effects these stereotypes have in society.
      Expected Learning Outcomes: Learn proper language and updated used in the field of aging, define agism, and ways to begin to break down the walls of agism.
    • Objective 2: Gain an understanding the biological, psychological, cognitive, and social developmental theories focusing on older adults.
      Expected Learning Outcomes: Identify various developmental theories related to older adults and describe the effects that occur as we age.
    • Objective 3: Understand psychological well-being in older adults, healthy aging, and factors to promote aging well.
      Expected Learning Outcomes: Define healthy aging, identify factors to promote healthy aging
    • Objective 4: Become familiar with the various community resources available to older adults.
      Expected Learning Outcomes: Identify various community resources through a continuum of services supporting healthy older adults to individuals who require higher level of care.
    • Objective 5: Prepare for a career in the field of gerontology.
      Expected Learning Outcomes: Express critical thought and problem solving by applying research and supported evidence into practice. Students will demonstrate an awareness, attitude, and knowledge required to equitably engage with older adults and peers of diverse backgrounds.
    Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:

    TBD

    Course Description

    Overview of psychological theories of leadership. Reviews leadership as a process, analysis of leader and followers' behaviors, and situational characteristics. Analysis of historical and modern case studies will be used to apply theoretical concepts. Additionally, students will be able to apply what they learned to their everyday lives.

    Expected Learning Outcomes:

    Upon the completion of this course, students should be able to:

    • Describe concepts, principles, and theories of Leadership defined psychologically
    • Explore the dynamics of leadership theory in students' daily lives (work and organizations they are members of)
    • Identify components and contributing factors in the development of one's leadership style
    • Explain issues that professionals in leadership positions often encounter
    • Apply course materials to improve their critical thinking, problem-solving, and decision making within organizations
    • Demonstrate effective writing and critical thinking through analysis of leadership case studies and leadership interview
    Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:
    • Career & Self Development: Throughout this course, students will have numerous opportunities to self-reflect and discover their current leadership traits, skills, and abilities as applied to their personal and work lives. In addition, the student will create one Leadership S.M.A.R.T. goal to work towards during this semester to assist in their personal and career development by taking this course.
    • Critical Thinking: Students will exercise their critical thinking skills as they analyze Leadership Case studies and respond to self-questionnaires. In addition, in-depth critical thinking will be required throughout and in their final Leadership Interview Analysis project. Finally, students are challenged to relate what they learned in the course to an actual leader in their community.
    • Communication: Students will develop and enhance their communication skills through email correspondence with various leaders within their community.
    • Equity & Inclusion: Students will complete a Cultural Diversity Awareness Questionnaire to help them identify attitudes and perspectives regarding cultural diversity, bring awareness and understanding of potential cultural biases, and understand potential consequences of ones approach to diversity in the workplace.
    • Professionalism: Students will exercise their professionalism while interacting with their interviewees and their assignments about their experiences. They keep their interviewee information private yet share enough information to explain key ideas and takeaways.
    • Technology: Students will utilize various online learning tools to complete assignments and collaborate with their peers. Students will actively work with D2L, email, Google Slides, Adobe, PowerPoint, YouTube, Zoom, etc.

    Course Description

    Topics include sleep-wake rhythms, sleep deprivation, dreams, and the diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders.

    Expected Learning Outcomes:

    Upon the completion of this course, students should be able to:

    • Develop a deeper understanding of psychology research and methods in the area of sleep science.
    • Develop a deeper understanding of typical sleep patterns and sleep disorders, including diagnosis and treatment.
    • Learn to critically evaluate sleep research.
    • Successfully observe our own sleep behavior using standard sleep data collection methods and learn how to work with group level sleep data.
    • Develop skills in public outreach, including the formulation of materials that can communicate important data-driven findings in sleep research.
    • Gain exposure to careers in this area during a final panel discussion on applied therapeutics and other career paths in sleep science.
    Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:

    TBD

    Course Description

    The major goal of this course is to provide a broad overview of the field of forensic and the numerous ways that psychology interacts with the law. The discipline of forensic psychology has become extremely popular for students over the past two decades, in part because of numerous TV programs addressing the topic such as: Law & Order, CSI, Criminal Minds, to name a few. Forensic psychology courses are being taught in numerous universities and there are now over 20 graduate programs in the United States offering doctorates in either forensic psychology or psychology and law. A good understanding of forensic psychology will benefit students entering into a number of professions including: corrections, child protective services, probation, mental health, forensic sciences, the law, etc.

    Expected Learning Outcomes:

    Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to….

    • Describe the diversity of topics included under the heading of forensic psychology.
    • Explain research, policy, and controversy surrounding the topics within forensic psychology.
    • Identify different ways that the law and psychology interact in both criminal and civil settings.
    • Describe the different roles psychologists can play in the legal system.
    • Critically examine the issues, myths, and facts surrounding forensic psychology.
    Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:

    TBD

    Course Description

    Development of the discipline of psychology, primarily in the last hundred years, examined in the context of significant events occurring in society and in other disciplines. Discussion and critical evaluation of psychology as a profession and a science and of the major schools of thought: structuralism, functionalism, associationism, behaviorism, Gestalt psychology, psychoanalysis, and cognitive psychology.

    Expected Learning Outcomes:
    • Describe the philosophical and scientific influences that have shaped the development of psychology.
    • Identify key figures throughout history and explain how their ideas influenced the development of psychology.
    • Name and describe the major systems of psychology.
    • Compare and contrast the major systems of psychology in terms of how they viewed the study of psychological phenomena.
    • Identify key figures within each system and explain how their ideas impacted the study of psychology.
    • Describe the state of contemporary psychology and explain how enduring questions are still present in the field.
    Job-Related Skills and Career Readiness Competencies:

    TBD

    Updated: 09/13/22