Naps Hinder Learning in Children With Down Syndrome

Naps Hinder Learning in Children With Down Syndrome

A growing body of research has linked sleep with improved learning and memory consolidation in both children and adults. Yet, a new study done at the University of Arizona shows that napping may not be universally beneficial. Researchers found that while napping can help young, typically developing children learn, it may have the opposite effect in children with Down syndrome — a population in which memory difficulties and sleep disorders are common. The findings, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, are among the first to show that naps may actually increase memory loss in certain populations.
 
"In children with Down syndrome, there's something about having a nap right after learning that seemed to keep them from retaining information as well, which is totally different than what happened in typically developing children, who benefitted from that nap," said Jamie Edgin, UA associate professor of psychology and senior author of the PNAS paper. 
 
 
Published Date: 
10/30/2018 - 09:56