Having a Partner Present – or in Mind – May Keep Blood Pressure Down

Having a Partner Present – or in Mind – May Keep Blood Pressure Down

When faced with a stressful situation, thinking about your romantic partner may help keep your blood pressure under control just as effectively as actually having your significant other in the room with you, according to a new study by University of Arizona psychologists.

For the study, published in the journal Psychophysiology, 102 participants were asked to complete a stressful task – submerging one foot into 3 inches of cold water ranging from 38 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit. Researchers measured participants' blood pressure, heart rate and heart rate variability before, during and after the task.

The participants, all of whom were in committed romantic relationships, were randomly assigned to one of three conditions when completing the task. They either had their significant other sitting quietly in the room with them during the task, they were instructed to think about their romantic partner as a source of support during the task, or they were instructed to think about their day during the task.

Those who had their partner physically present in the room or who thought about their partner had a lower blood pressure response to the stress of the cold water than the participants in the control group, who were instructed to think about their day. Heart rate and heart rate variability did not vary between the three groups. 

The effect on blood pressure reactivity was just as powerful whether the partner was physically present or merely conjured mentally.

Although previous studies have suggested that having a partner present or visualizing a partner can help manage the body's physiological response to stress, the new study, led by UA psychology doctoral student Kyle Bourassa, suggests that the two things are equally effective – at least when it comes to blood pressure reactivity.

Read the full article from UA News

Published Date: 
01/17/2019 - 11:21