Jeff Stone

Jeff Stone's picture
Real name: 
Professor
Director, Social Psychology of Sport Laboratory
Director, Self and Attitudes Laboratory
Degree(s): 

1993-97 Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Psychology, Princeton University
1988-93 Ph.D. in Social Psychology, University of California at Santa Cruz
1985-88 Bachelor of Arts in Psychology with Honors, San Jose State University  

Telephone: 
(520) 626-2438
Office: 
Psychology 436
Research Interests: 
  • Investigating how people change their health attitude and behaviors
  •  Understanding the role of implicit bias in health disparities
  • Studying social factors that influence performance in sports

My research investigates how people change their attitudes and behavior in the domains of health, education and sports.  For example, my students and I investigate how the need to be consistent motivates people to bring their behavior into line with their beliefs about good health. 

We also investigate how implicit stereotypes and prejudice influence judgment and behavior, such as when medical professionals interact with minority patients, or when fans watch a sporting event.  To reduce stereotyping and prejudice, our lab develops and tests the effectiveness of new strategies for changing bias, ranging from classroom workshops and online teaching modules, to the subtle cues that members of stigmatized groups can display.

Selected Publications: 

Focella, E., Stone, J., Fernandez, N.C., Cooper, J., & Hogg, M. (in press).  Vicarious hypocrisy: Bolstering attitudes and taking action after exposure to a hypocritical in-group member.  Journal of Experimental Social Psychology.

Zestcott, C. A., Bean, M. G., & Stone, J.  (in press).  Evidence of negative implicit attitudes toward individuals with a tattoo.  Group Processes and Intergroup Relations. 

Bean, M. G., Stone, J., Moskowitz, G. B., Badger, T., & Focella, E. (2013).  Evidence of implicit stereotyping of Hispanic patients by nursing and medical students. Nursing Research, 62(5), 362-367.

Stone, J., Harrison, C. K., & Mottley, J. (2012).  "Don't call me a student-athlete":  The effect of identity priming on stereotype threat for academically engaged African-American college athletes.  Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 34:2, 99-106.

Stone, J., & Moskowitz, G. B.  (2011).  Nonconscious racial bias in medical decision-making:  What can be done to reduce it?  Medical Education, 45, 768-776.

Stone, J., Whitehead, J., Schmader, T., and Focella, E.  (2011).  Thanks for asking: Self-affirming questions reduce backlash when stigmatized targets confront prejudice.  Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 47, 589-598.

Courses Taught: 

Psy 360  Introduction to Social Psychology
Psy 461a  The Social Psycholoogy of Attitudes
Psy 496H  The science of prejudice reduction
Psy 596a  Seminar in Social Psychology

Research Program: