Could Limiting Naps Support Learning in Children With Down Syndrome?

Could Limiting Naps Support Learning in Children With Down Syndrome?

Children with Down syndrome tend to nap much later in development than typically developing children.

A robust and growing body of research explores the effects of sleep and napping on learning and memory development in young children. Yet, less work has looked at the cognitive implications of naps for children with Down syndrome — a population that commonly suffers with significant sleep challenges.

Jamie Edgin, a psychologist at the University of Arizona, plans to explore this topic with support from a new grant from the LuMind Research Down Syndrome Foundation, the nation's largest nonprofit funding organization for Down syndrome research.

While typically developing children tend to stop napping around age 3, it's common for children with Down syndrome to continue taking regular naps much later in development — as late as age 8, said Edgin, an assistant professor in the UA's Department of Psychology, co-director of the UA's cognition and neural systems graduate program and a faculty member in the UA's Sonoran University Center for Excellence in Disabilities, Education, Research and Service.

Read the full article here:

https://uanews.arizona.edu/story/could-limiting-naps-support-learning-children-down-syndrome

Published Date: 
08/21/2017 - 15:56