Researchers Test Autobiographical Memory for Early Alzheimer's Detection

Researchers Test Autobiographical Memory for Early Alzheimer's Detection

UA psychologist Matthew Grilli found that people who carry a gene variant that increases the risk for Alzheimer's disease have greater difficulty describing detailed memories of past events.

Testing how well people remember past events in their lives could help medical professionals make early predictions about who is at risk for developing Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study from the University of Arizona.  

Researchers administered an "autobiographical memory" test to a group of 35 healthy adults, about half of whom carry the gene variant APOE e4 — a known genetic risk factor that nearly doubles the chances of developing Alzheimer's disease. As a group, those with the genetic risk described memories with much less detail than those without it.

Sometimes called a disease with a clinically silent beginning, Alzheimer's is difficult to detect early even though changes in the brain related to the disease may begin to happen years or even decades before an individual starts to exhibit memory difficulties, said UA neuropsychologist Matthew Grilli, lead author of the new research, which is published in the Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society.

Read the full article from UA Now here

Published Date: 
08/23/2018 - 09:27